Population

 

What are the significant features of the National Population Policy 2000? Evaluate how effective this policy has been in meeting its objectives. (200 Words)
 
India accounts for its second place in highest population in world and this made India to launch National family planning programme in 1952 , though the birth rate started decreasing , death rate also decreased sharply which led to overall increase in population. Here by where parliament brought National population policy in 2000.
 
Features of NPP
  • Address the unmet needs for contraception;
  • health care infrastructure and personnel and to provide integrated service delivery for basic reproductive and child health care;
  • Reduce IMR,MMR, TFR by certain levels ;
  • Prevent and control communicable diseases;
  • free and compulsory school education up to 14 years of age ;
  • promoting delayed marriage for girls ;
  • promote small family norm .
 
Effectiveness of policy seen in measures adopted by govt
  • Right to Education under Article 21A
  • With the help of 84th constitutional amendment seizing in state wide allocations of seats in loksabha and rajyasabha till 2026 where it would serve as motivational measure to put blockade to population explosion ;
  • National Population Stabilization Fund was setup to meet the demands ;
  • Programmes like ICDS , Midday meal , National rural health mission , janani suraksha yojana ;
  • Free contraceptives & sterilization methods , Recent success in polio immunization .
 
There were still failures in Reducing IMR and Fertility rates, death of women in chattisgarh due to faulty sterilization and some other objectives failing to achieve in rural areas . Accomplishing the objectives merely in quantitative terms shows success only in numerical but if met in qualitative terms and with strict implementation it will satisfy the demands to its fullest to the human needs
 
 
Court on Sterilization Camps:
  • SC has directed government to end mass sterilisation camps
  • Poor and tribal men and women cannot be reduced to mere statistics in the country’s population control campaigns
  • Mass sterilisation camps are perverse products of the Centre’s population control campaigns driven by informal targets and incentives
  • They infringe on the “reproductive freedoms of the most vulnerable groups of society whose economic and social conditions make them easy targets to coercion”.
  • The Centre has also failed in its duty to effectively monitor sterilisation